Bacon-wrapped Scallops or Cheese Puffs? How to Create the most Mouthwatering Snackable Content for Consumers
Executive Conversations

 Author(s): , Posted on September 28th, 2017

I’m a huge fan of snackable content and as a marketer, I am immersed in it. From this professional vantage point, I have observed that the best snackable content is not noteworthy because it is short, quick, and easy. The best snackable content is defined by being mouthwatering, tantalizing, and intriguing. Consider the difference through these two scenarios …

You are sitting down in a restaurant and the waiter appears with his tray held high. “Compliments of the chef!” he announces. With a flourish, he places a small dish in front of you. One succulent scallop wrapped in perfectly crisped bacon rests in the center of artful swirls of aioli sauce. The smell alone has you salivating. The first bite puts you in heaven. You just can’t wait for the main course since the amuse-bouche (a.k.a. free appetizer) was so delectable.

Now, re-imagine the scene. The waiter comes, says, “Hungry?” and tosses a small bag of cheese puffs onto your placemat – the round ones dusted with orange cheese-flavored powder that make Styrofoam look like a healthy nutritional alternative. Far from generating anticipation of the main course, such an offering is likely to make you get up and leave the restaurant.

Both free samples are short, quick, and easy to consume. But only one leaves you craving more. Apply this image to creating snackable content. You want your content to:

  • Stand out from the crowd. Cheese puffs can be purchased at any store and, consequently, don’t make an impact. You want your content to be so unique that the consumer can’t help but take notice of your offer, product, and company.
  • Target your market very specifically. Cheese puffs are a “lowest common denominator” kind of food. You might find them in pre-made lunch packs or in vending machines. Cheese-puff content has the same appeal … namely, none. Instead, create content that makes your target consumer’s mouth water because you have honed in on exactly what he or she wants, needs, and finds appealing. Your content doesn’t have to appeal to everyone – in fact, it shouldn’t. But it should be irresistible to your target market.
  • Create a strong connection with the consumer. An entire bowl of cheese puffs can disappear during a football game without a single thought about what is being chewed and swallowed. Compare that to a single bacon-wrapped scallop, where each bite is savored – the sight, smell, texture, and taste all combine in ecstasy. Your content should have the same connection to the consumer: engaging the consumer entirely for that brief moment in time that you have their attention.
  • Make an impression that lasts. No one was ever impressed by a cheese puff. But a delectable bacon-wrapped scallop may remain in a person’s memory for years. Your content should be memorable: after all, you want the consumer to remember you when it comes time to buy.
  • Give great value. How much is a cheese puff worth? Nada. But a succulent scallop wrapped in tantalizing bacon? That has real value. Your content should give value – unexpected value, in fact – to the consumer. A fact, an insight, a tool, an idea, a solution … you may only have their attention for a few seconds or minutes, but make that time worth it for them.
  • Get consumers to the next step. People eat a cheese puff and then … nothing. They go about their day. That’s not what you want. You want to offer the amuse-bouche that will lead logically to the appetizer, then the main course, then the dessert, then the check! In other words, your snackable content should be the top of your sales funnel that helps people progress all the way to conversion from consumer into customer.

The bottom line? Don’t focus on “short.” Sure, snackable content is short: that goes without saying. Focus on “mouthwatering” if you want to bring the consumer in for a full-course meal!

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About the Author

Celso Puente is a 20-year marketing veteran with a wealth of expertise working in the information technology and services industry. As Vice President of Global Industry Marketing for Unisys, he provides leadership for marketing to the Financial Services, Public Sector, Healthcare & Life Sciences, and Travel & Transportation industries. Read all Posts





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